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FAQ's



What is the A Girl Called Hope programme?
Who can come?
What is the length/duration of programme?
How bad/severe do I need to be to come into the programme?
What is the age range?
What costs are involved?
Do you have to be a Christian/religious/go to church to come to A Girl Called Hope?
What method of counselling is used at A Girl Called Hope?
Can I complete University studies while I’m at A Girl Called Hope?
What and when do I eat?
What if I am a vegetarian, vegan etc?
What if I’m already on a dietician set meal plan?
What happens if I need to see a Doctor?
Can I come if I am on medication?
What about seeing a specialist for different issues?
What about seeing a Dietician?
What are the recreational activities?
Do I get to go out?
When do I get to see my family/friends?
Mail?
Phone calls?
What happens when I finish the programme?



What is the A Girl Called Hope programme?
A Girl Called Hope runs a six month residential programme for young women aged between 16 and 28 years with life controlling issues and behaviours. The areas that we cater for include: eating disorders, issues relating to past abuse, addictions, unplanned pregnancy, self-harm, depression, anxiety, suicidal thoughts. There is a structured weekly routine which includes activities such as:

  • Personal development and life skills classes
  • Individual counselling and therapy
  • Group counselling
  • Health and fitness
  • Practical household duties
  • Church attendance
  • Shopping and recreation

A Girl Called Hope is for young women who have a strong desire to bring about change in their lives. As a non coersive programme A Girl Called Hope respects the right of each individual to make decisions about their own life. A Girl Called Hope openly acknowledges that the programme offered is based on Christian principles. Should an applicant choose to accept a place at A Girl Called Hope they are asked to participate in all aspects of the programme.


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Who can come?
Young women 16 to 28 years with a strong desire to change their lives. Entry to the programme is voluntary – that is, young women make their own choice to come to A Girl Called Hope. Once in the programme, they are expected to participate in all aspects of the programme.

The areas that we cater for include: eating disorders, issues relating to past abuse, addictions, unplanned pregnancy, self-harm, depression, anxiety, suicidal thoughts.

An individual care plan is developed for each young woman. Access to health professionals including a Dietitian, GP and specialists is available as required. A Girl Called Hope is committed to assisting with family restoration where appropriate and possible.

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What is the length/duration of programme?
The programme is six months and we ask that young women are committed to this amount of time. This timeframe can be adapted to suit individual requirements.

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How bad/severe do I need to be to come into the programme?
Admission to the programme is not based primarily on the severity of the issue, but the applicants strong desire for change in their lives. We acknowledge that a residential programme will not be the appropriate response for all young women and as such will refer to other services as necessary.


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What is the age range?
The age range is 16 to 28 years.

A young woman may apply if she is under 16, however entry would only be possible once turned 16.

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What costs are involved?
The programme is provided free of charge to the participants, however they need to be able to pay for weekly personal shopping and medical costs. These personal costs can be covered independently or through a sponsor that the resident has identified (can be family member/friend/church).

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Do you have to be a Christian/religious/go to church to come to A Girl Called Hope?

A Girl Called Hope openly acknowledges that the programme offered is based on Christian principles and includes related activities such as attending church, devotions (bible reading and reflective time). While applicants do not need to be Christian to participate in the programme, it is important that they consider this element when applying. We ask that residents are open to hearing about God and exploring their faith.

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What method of counselling is used at A Girl Called Hope?

The Counsellors at A Girl Called Hope work holistically with residents and draw on a wide range of therapeutic modalities, including elements of CBT (Cognitive Behavioural Therapy), DBT (Dialectical Behavioural Therapy), IDT (Interactive Drawing Therapy) and Narrative Therapy. Our counsellors use tools which deal with exploration of faith, choosing to forgive, renewing the mind and generational patterns.

All residents set goals for what they’d like to achieve through their time at A Girl Called Hope.


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Can I complete University studies while I'm at A Girl Called Hope?
We encourage young women to defer their studies while they are in the programme. Most Universities have an option to defer studies due to special circumstances.

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What and when do I eat?

Meal Plans are developed by the Household Manager in conjunction with the Dietitian. All residents eat three meals a day, with additional snacks for morning and afternoon tea, and supper. Residents who require individualised meal plans (those with disordered eating and heath issues) meet monthly with the Dietitian who develops this with them.

 

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What if I am a vegetarian, vegan etc?
A Girl Called Hope operates a set meal plan designed to ensure a healthy diet for the residents. While some meals have a vegetarian option, generally the meals include meat. Residents are required to eat the meals that are set. 

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What if I’m already on a dietician set meal plan?

A Girl Called Hope will liaise with community dietitians to ensure a smooth transition for residents into the programme.
New residents will meet with the A Girl Called Hope dietitian to tailor the set meal plans to their individual needs.

 

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What happens if I need to see a Doctor?
A Girl Called Hope arranges mediacal appointments for residents as and when required.

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Can I come if I am on medication?
We accept young women who are on medication. Any changes to medication are made in consultation with a GP.

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What about seeing a specialist for different issues?
Specialist appointments for residents are arranged as requested. This may include seeing a physiotherapist, psychiatrist etc.

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What about seeing a Dietitian?
Residents who are dealing with eating and health related issues speak with the dietitian monthly.

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What are the recreational activities?
Residents participate in set fitness activities three days a week. This includes attending a gym, bush/beach walks, and other sporting activites.

Onsite recreational activities include swimming, volleyball, badminton, petanque. Residents also particapate in other interests such as music, dance, art, scrap-booking, and card making.

Some residents are on fitness restrictions due to their health. This is determined on an individual basis.

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Do I get to go out?
A Girl Called Hope has organised activities where all residents go out. This includes spending an afternoon at the shops, recreational activities, going to church and other activities from time to time.

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When do I get to see my family/friends?
Weekend leave is encouraged every 4 to 6 weeks. In this time you spend time with family and friends.

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Mail?


Residents can receive emails and mail each day. Emails can be sent in the weekends.


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Phone calls?
Generally phone calls are made and received on the weekends, however family are asked to call at anytime should a significant situation arise which involves/affects a resident.

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What happens when I finish the programme?

A Girl Called Hope provides a Transitional Care Programme which commences  up to eight weeks prior to graduation. This programme starts by assisting  the resident with finding  accomodation, vocational guidance, budgeting, support structures and continues for twelve months following their graduation. An accountability mentor will also be identified in the graduates community to provide further follow up and support for the graduate.

 

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